Calories Burned

Calories Burned

Count how many calories you burn doing your favorite activities or how long you should do an activity to lose weight. How many calories did you burn?

  • Enter your age and gender
  • Enter your height and weight
  • Enter the number of minutes for any of the activities you do (1 or all) click the (+) to expand the categories
  • Click on calculate at the bottom of the form for your calorie calculator personal report
Knowing the number of calories you burn in conjuction with a sensible diet can help you lose or gain weight.

What are calories?

A calorie is a measure of energy, just as a pound is a measure of weight and a mile is a measure of distance. So the amount of energy you exert in doing an activity is measured by the calories burn rate.

How to burn calories?

That's easy, just be alive! Your body is constantly burning calories to keep your body functioning. To burn more calories, do more activities, and the more strenuous the activity the greater the calorie burn.

How many calories to lose one pound?

You have to burn 3500 calories to lose one pound of weight. This is why you should use a calorie counter regularly.

How to lose 20 pounds?

You have to have a calorie deficit* of 70,000 calories to lose 20 pounds (*burn 70,000 more calories than the number of calories you eat).

Enter your details:

Imperial Metric
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Select your height:
Enter your weight:

Activity

Minutes



Around the house
Brush teeth
Carrying an Infant
Chop Wood
Cleaning Gutters
Cleaning windows
Clearing light brush, thinning garden
Cooking
Digging, spading, composting
Dusting or polishing furniture
Garden
Gardening - container
Gardening with heavy power tools
Housework
Ironing
Laundry
Loading/Unloading a car
Mopping
Mowing - push
Mowing - riding
Packing Suitcase
Push stroller with child
Putting away Groceries
Raking lawn
Rearranging Furniture
Scrubbing floors
Shovel Snow
Showering
Walk / run play with kids
Washing car
Washing dishes
Yard work
Exercise
Aerobics - high impact
Aerobics - low impact
Ashtanga yoga
Bikram / hot yoga
Calisthenics / exercise - moderate
Calisthenics / exercise - vigorous
Circuit training - cross fit
Cycling / cycling 12-14 mph
Cycling / cycling 14-16 mph
Elliptical trainer
Hatha yoga
Jogging
Jumping jacks - moderate
Jumping jacks - vigorous
Lifting weights - general
Lifting weights - vigorous
Pilates Advanced
Pilates Beginner
Pilates Intermediate
Power yoga
Pushups - moderate
Pushups - vigorous
Rope jumping
Rowing machine - moderate
Rowing machine - vigorous
Running 10 mph
Running 12 mph
Running 5 mph
Running 6 mph
>Running 7 mph
Running 8 mph
Situps / crunches - moderate
Situps / crunches - vigorous
Ski machine
Spinning - moderate
Spinning - vigorous
Stair Step Machine
Stationary bicycle / spinning - moderate
Stationary bicycle / spinning - vigorous
Step aerobics - high impact
Step aerobics - low impact
Stretching
Vinyasa yoga
Walking 2 mph
Walking 3 mph
Walking 4 mph
Water Aerobics
Zumba
Miscellaneous
Driving
Elder care, Disabled adult
Kissing, hugging
Organizing a room
Playing guitar
Playing piano
Reading
Riding in a bus, car, train, subway
Sex - foreplay
Sex - intercourse
Shopping
Sitting / resting
Sleeping
Standing
Studying
Talking on phone
Touring/Traveling
Using Crutches
Walking - up stairs
Walking the dog
Writing
Sports & Recreation
Archery
Backpacking
Backpacking
Badminton
Basketball - officiating
Basketball - shooting baskets
Basketball 1/2 court
Basketball full court
Bicycling / biking - mountain
Bicycling / cycling 12-14 mph
Bicycling / cycling 14-16 mph
Billiards
Bowling
Boxing - in ring
Boxing - punching bag
Canoeing 2 mph
Canoeing 4 mph
Card playing
Casino gambling - standing
Coaching - team sports
Cricket
Croquet
Cycling - leisure
Dancing - aerobic, ballet, modern
Dancing - ballroom slow
Dancing - disco, folk, step, line, polka, country
Dancing - ethnic, cultural
Dancing - fast ballroom
Dancing - tap
Fencing
Fishing
Football - full contact
Football - playing catch
Football - touch
Frisbee playing
Frisbee, Ultimate
Golf - carry clubs
Golf - cart
Golf - pull cart
Handball
Hang Gliding
Hiking
Hockey
Hopscotch/Dodge ball
Horseback riding - galloping
Horseback riding - trotting
Horseback riding - walking
Hunting
Judo - martial arts
Jumping on trampoline
Kayaking
Lacrosse
Marching band
Paddle board - standing
Paddleboat
Playing board games
Racquetball casual
Racquetball competitive
Repelling
Rock climbing
Rugby
Scuba diving
Skateboarding
Skating - moderate
Skating - vigorous
Skiing - cross country
Skiing - downhill
Skiing - water
Sledding, toboganning
Snorkeling
Snowmobiling
Soccer casual
Soccer competitive
Softball or baseball
Surfing
Swimming - moderate
Swimming - vigorous
Table tennis
Tennis - doubles
Tennis - singles
Volleyball - competitive
Volleyball - recreation
Work related
Carpentry/Workshop
Chef - cooking
Construction/Remodeling
Custodial work - light
Custodial work - moderate
Farming/Feeding livestock
Hairstyling
Hanging sheetrock
Horse grooming
Laying or removing carpet
Massage therapist
Painting house
Plumbing activities
Roofing
Tailoring, Cutting
Weaving cloth
Calculating Result...
Select your gender:
Enter your age:
Select your height:
Enter your weight:

Activity

Minutes



Around the house
Brush teeth
Packing Suitcase
Chop Wood
Cleaning Gutters
Cleaning windows
Clearing light brush, thinning garden
Cooking
Digging, spading, composting
Dusting or polishing furniture
Garden
Gardening - container
Gardening with heavy power tools
>Housework
Ironing
Laundry
Rugby
Mopping
Mowing - push
Mowing - riding
Packing Suitcase
Push stroller with child
Putting away Groceries
Raking lawn
Rearranging Furniture
Scrubbing floors
Shovel Snow
Showering
Walk/run play with kids
Washing car
Washing dishes
Yard work
Exercise
Aerobics - high impact
Aerobics - low impact
Playing board games
Elder care, Disabled adult
Calisthenics - moderate
Calisthenics - vigorous
Circuit training - cross fit
Cycling 19.2-22.4 kph
Cycling 22.4-25.6 kph
Elliptical trainer
Card playing
Jogging
Backpacking
Carrying an Infant
Hairstyling
Hang Gliding
Farming/Feeding livestock
Construction/Remodeling
Push stroller with child
Loading/Unloading a car
Putting away Groceries
Tailoring, Cutting
Rope jumping
Rowing Machine - moderate
Rowing Machine - vigorous
Running 16 kph
Running 19.2 kph
Running 8 kph
Running 9.6 kph
Running 11.2 kph
Running 12.8 kph
Hopscotch/Dodge ball
Carpentry/Workshop
Ski Machine
Spinning - moderate
Spinning - vigorous
Stair Step Machine
Stationary Bicycle - moderate
Stationary Bicycle - vigorous
Step Aerobics - high impact
Step Aerobics - low impact
Stretching
Touring/Traveling
Walking 3.2 kph
Walking 4.8 kph
Walking 6.4 kph
Water Aerobics
Zumba
Miscellaneous
Driving
Elder care, Disabled adult
Kissing, hugging
Organizing a room
Playing Guitar
Playing Piano
Reading
Riding in a bus, car, train, subway
Sex - foreplay
Sex - intercourse
Shopping
Sitting
Sleeping
Standing
Studying
Talking on phone
Lacrosse
Using Crutches
Walking - up stairs
Walking the dog
Writing
Sports & Recreation
Archery
Backpacking
Cleaning Gutters
Badminton
Basketball - officiating
Basketball - shooting baskets
Basketball 1/2 court
Basketball full court
Bicycling - Mountain
Bicycling 19.2-22.4 kph
Bicycling 22.4-25.6 kph
Billiards
Bowling
Boxing - in ring
Boxing - punching bag
Canoeing 3.2 kph
Canoeing 6.4 kph
Using Crutches
Casino gambling - standing
Coaching - team sports
Cricket
Croquet
Bicycling - leisure
Dancing - aerobic, ballet, modern
Dancing - ballroom slow
Dancing - disco, folk, step, line, polka, country
Dancing - ethnic, cultural
Dancing - fast ballroom
Dancing - tap
Fencing
Fishing
Football - full contact
Football - playing catch
Football - touch
Frisbee playing
Frisbee, Ultimate
Golf - carry clubs
Golf - cart
Golf - pull cart
Handball
Frisbee, Ultimate
Hiking
Hockey
Hopscotch/Dodge ball
Horseback riding - galloping
Horseback riding - trotting
Horseback riding - walking
Hunting
Judo - martial arts
Jumping on trampoline
Kayaking
Lacrosse
Marching band
Paddle board - standing
Paddleboat
Snorkeling
Racquetball casual
Racquetball competitive
Repelling
Rock climbing
Rugby
Scuba diving
Skateboarding
Skating - moderate
Skating - vigorous
Skiing - cross country
Skiing - downhill
Skiing - water
Sledding, toboganning
Snorkeling
Snowmobiling
Soccer casual
Soccer competitive
Softball or baseball
Surfing
Swimming - moderate
Swimming - vigorous
Table tennis
Tennis - doubles
Tennis - singles
Volleyball - competitive
Volleyball - recreation
Work related
Carpentry/Workshop
Chef - cooking
Construction/Remodeling
Custodial work - light
Custodial work - moderate
Farming/Feeding livestock
Weaving cloth
Hanging sheetrock
Horse grooming
Laying or removing carpet
Massage therapist
Painting House
Plumbing activities
Roofing
Tailoring, Cutting
Weaving cloth
Calculating Result...

Six Simple Ways to Burn More Calories

Losing weight can seem like a daunting process. Not only do you have to follow a restricted diet; you also have to find time to exercise. If your schedule is already packed, it may seem like you do not have time for weight loss.

Fortunately, there are simple ways to burn more calories and boost your weight loss. Here, learn about six simple ways to increase your calorie burn and jump start your weight loss! You will be off and running in that new body in no time.

Wearing a cold vest.

Also known as a cooling vest or ice vest, the revolutionary vests must be used appropriately for you to experience the best results. You need to use it only when you are at a comfortable temperature. Examples of these scenarios are sitting in your car, watching a football game, driving, working in the office or resting in a room or in an outdoor area when not exercising.

You keep the vest in the freezer when you are not using it. It takes less than a minute to get it from the freezer and on your body. After that, you can go about your daily tasks as if the vest does not exist. Wear it as long as you feel comfortable or until the ice melts away. Remove the cold vest and return it into the freezer.

When you wear it twice a day, you burn more calories than you would burn working out in the gym (calorie burning claims are as much as 500 calories a day). It won’t improve your fitness like a trip to the gym will, but anything that can help us boost the metabolism without chemicals is a blessing.

We recommend the highly rated and affordable Cold Shoulder Vest. (click here)

Sip a Cup of Coffee to Drop Weight

Your morning cup of java could actually aid your weight loss efforts. According to the results of a 1990 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, caffeine consumption can increase calorie burn. A second study, published in a 1994 edition of the International Journal of Obesity, found that the consumption of 200 milligrams of caffeine increased calorie burn by 6.7 percent during a three hour period.

Drink your coffee black, and avoid adding fattening creams and sweeteners, or you will cancel out the calorie-burning benefits of caffeine.

Climb the Stairs to Increase Calorie Burn

Stair climbing is a calorie-blasting exercise. According to our calculator, a 140-pound woman will burn 9 calories per minute by running up the stairs. If you are pressed for a time, a few minutes of running up and down the stairs will burn enough calories to speed your weight loss.

Spice Things up for Weight Loss

You could increase your calorie burn by drizzling some hot sauce on your food. Hot sauce is made from hot peppers, which contain a spice called capsaicin. According to a 2012 study in the journal Chemical Senses, capsaicin increases both calorie burn and fat burn. Use hot sauce to add some flavor to a chicken breast for a healthy dinner, or mix in some hot sauce to spice up your scrambled eggs.

Get up and Move to Burn Calories

Fidgeting could increase your calorie burn and speed up your weight loss. In 1986, researchers for the Journal of Clinical Investigation found that fidgeting was a large contributor to daily calorie burn. In fact, this type of movement resulted in a calorie burn ranging from 100 to 800 calories per day! Tap your foot to the music on the radio while sitting in the office, or get up and walk back and forth while talking on the phone.

Focus on High Intensity Interval Training for Increased Calorie Burn

High intensity interval training, which involves alternating periods of intense effort with recovery periods, can help you blast away calories. In 2014, researchers for the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, & Metabolism found that a 20-minute high intensity interval training workout boosted metabolism just as much as 50 minutes of cycling at a steady pace during the 24 hours following the exercise. In the study, participants in the interval training group cycled at a sprint pace for 60 seconds and then recovered for 60 seconds following each sprint. Add high intensity interval training to your routine to increase your metabolism in less time!

Adding interval training workouts to your routine can boost your calorie burn for an entire day. Check out the HealthStatus program based on HIIT and add this to your routine. In addition, drinking caffeine, consuming capsaicin-rich hot sauce, fidgeting, and climbing the stairs are ways to burn calories without much time or effort. With these strategies, weight loss doesn’t have to be complicated!

Questions about Calories

How many calories should I eat to lose weight? Use our How many calories to lose weight calculator.
How many calories should I eat to gain weight? Use our How many calories to gain weight calculator.
How many calories do I burn a day? This is your basal metabolic rate, our BMR calculator will tell you the answer.
How many calories do you burn running a mile? Distance is irrelevant in measuring this, time and weight are the key elements for determining the calorie count.
How can I burn calories without exercise? Check out our article on how to burn calories without exercise Does farting burn calories?(yes, people really ask this question) Read about how many calories does a fart burn?

Another important measurement for you to consider is you body mass index, also known as BMI, you can find out your BMI with our Body Mass Index – BMI Calculator

Calorie Saving Foods

How many calories are in a banana?

One large banana which is about one cup cut up, has about 121 calories, small bananas run around 90 calories. Bananas are a great snack.

What are the calories in an egg?

A large raw, hard boiled or fried (without adding fat) egg is a mere 78 calories!

What are the calories in an orange?

A cup of orange slices, or a medium size orange will be 62 calories, this number can fluctuate some depending on the variety, but this is a pretty good average.

Calculator Source: Exercise and Your Heart — A Guide to Physical Activity. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute / American Heart Association, DHHS, PHS, NIH Publication No. 93-1677.

Take the results of this for one day and add it to the results of the Basal Metabolic Rate calculator and you will know how many total calories you burn each day.

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HealthStatus has been operating since 1998 providing the best interactive health tools on the Internet, millions of visitors have used our health risk assessment, body fat and calories burned calculators. The HealthStatus editorial team has continued that commitment to excellence by providing our visitors with easy to understand high quality health content for many years.

29 Comments

    1. Danielle White

      HealthStatus is a mobile friendly site. And can be accessed on your phone. I hope this helps.

    2. Joel Penner

      Try “Myfitnesspal”
      Its a free app that does full calorie teacking and syncs with exercise apps.
      My wife lost 40 lbs using it, and all the body builders at my gym use it too. I successfully did a 15 lb body recomposition using the myfitnesspal app.
      I recommed it.

  1. Jacqueline D. Reply

    I’ve been using this feature for a few years. So far, no issues of any kind. I’ve been fine without an app. You should be OK.

  2. James Ferguson Reply

    There is a very big discrepancy between the Kcal burned for 30 minute elliptical on your calculator, vs the cound on the machine itself. 100% difference. When my elliptical says 300 Kcal, this calculator says 679. I don’t know which is right, but the guy at the YMCA says trust the machine (though I haven’t entered ht, wt, etc). What is your take on this?

    1. Danielle White

      Height and weight makes a big difference to the number of calories you are burning. The bigger you are the more calories you burn. But you also must factor in how hard you are working. At the end of the day these are both estimates.

    1. Danielle White

      Studying might require multiple books, sitting upright at a desk, note taking, or gathering resource materials. Where reading could be more sedentary in a lounge position.

  3. Chip S. Reply

    I’m thinking your calculator is a bit high, either that or I’m not using it right, so I’d like some advice on how to use it. I entered my gender, age, height and weight, and then I entered 24 hours worth of a particular day’s activities, including sleeping. It calculated 3259.2940 calories. Only 255 calories were for my mild 1-hour gym workout. I’m male, 66, 6’2″, 177lbs. On a 50 carbs, 30 fat, 20 protein, I’d still need over 150 grams of protein/day which my doctor says is too much for a man my age’s kidneys. You didn’t have a “sit relaxed and reclined with a laptop doing different things on the computer” entry where I spend about 8 hours/day so I used “studying” which calculated to 1298 calories. I’m really only mildly active during the day, just a couple of short walks a day and the usual errands and life-maintaining activities. I would think I’m an average 2,000 calorie/day guy. I don’t understand why it’s calculating so high (high in my opinion). Any thoughts? Thanks.

  4. Whatever Reply

    How could you possibly know how many calories are spent playing the piano or writing or weaving cloth??? I mean if they really, scientifically measured people of all ages, genders and sizes doing all these different things, then by all means, link the study(ies) otherwise GTFO….

    1. HealthStatus

      We know…

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      [drops mic]

  5. Danny Reply

    My mouse wheel does this infinite scroll thing. It took 3 seconds to scroll through the references. Somebody pissed off a scientist.

    1. Nicole

      Lol ithought the same thing! That was an epic response… Not just a mic drop. That was a mic explosion

  6. HSJ Reply

    Why is there no HIIT box in the exercise section I don’t think HIIT can be counted into any other option available in the given options

    1. Danielle White

      Good Point! Due to the variety of workouts in any given HIIT Program that is not easily calculated.

  7. Pat Reply

    Why are you guys citing articles that are so antiquated? For scientific content, the rule is nothing older than five years (because anything older than that is considered dated) and nothing newer than two years (because it hasn’t been around long enough to cycle through peer review circles).

    1. HealthStatus

      When something is measured in a validated manner, that measure stands until it is invalidated through a newer process. We don’t have to remeasure a liter every 5 years to know that it is defined as the volume of a cubic decimeter — a cube 0.1 meter on each side, as it has been since 1905.

  8. jordan.c Reply

    I put 0 mins in alot of boxs because I dont do that and I got to press calculate and says “Value must be greater than or equal to 1” I dont understand what im doing wrong ive been messing with this thing for an hour and i really need the results because its required for my summer school. HELP.

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